Connect with us

AR/VR

New Details About PSVR2 Have Been Leaked, Including A Release Window

Jesse Hoyt

Published

on

We may earn a small commission when you click or purchase an item using a link on this website.


Virtual reality has continued to grow since it burst onto the gaming scene. The lifelong video game fantasy had finally come true. The only issue was that it was wildly expensive and needed to be hooked up to a pretty beefy computer. Then in 2016, PlayStation finally brought virtual reality to PlayStation 4. This opened up an entirely new market for console gamers and was extremely successful as a result. Sure, PSVR couldn’t beat out competitors that were PC-based performance-wise, but it certainly wasn’t a slouch when it came to fun. Games like Beat Saber and Superhot made their way to consoles and suddenly VR became pretty consumer-friendly especially with a rather tame price tag of $399 compared to its PC counterparts. Now we’ve lept into the next generation of consoles and VR alike. Virtual reality has become substantially more accessible and PlayStation isn’t planning on passing up the opportunity to bring VR to PS5.

All this to say that we might finally have some more details on the system according to a new leak. There are two big pieces of information: the release window and info about new headset screens. Information about the new system has been pretty sparse and no official announcement or confirmation about these details has been made.


The leaked release window suggests that we’ll be seeing PlayStation 5 VR hit shelves during the holiday season of 2022. There’s no specific date, but the holiday season always refers to October, November, and December. This is a pretty typical release window and could have easily been guessed accurately based on popular release windows. It wouldn’t be a bad window either especially since the ongoing chip shortage is expected to somewhat return to normal by mid-2022.  

The other piece of information is about the screens that PS5 VR will utilize. The new VR system is said to be using Samsung OLED panels for its display. This may disappoint some tech-savvy fans because other VR systems have adopted LCD screens over OLED. OLED displays typically have better contrast (dynamic range), but LCDs outperform when it comes to producing brighter highlights. 

No details have been confirmed by Sony and leaks often turn out to be false, however, Sony’s absence at E3 definitely raises some questions. They might be planning to reveal the next generation of PSVR on their own turf during a State of Play presentation. Here’s to hoping we get some more info about PSVR soon.

After turning away from professional cooking, I refocused my efforts on something I love: writing. I can’t get enough of it. Copywriting, content writing, novels? Count me in. I have quite an array of writing interests, but right now I’m loving gaming and virtual reality, and I can’t wait to do more.

AR/VR

The Top 5 Best Virtual Reality Games Out Now

Jesse Hoyt

Published

on

There’s a lot of VR games out there right now and let’s be honest, most of them are kind of bad, but there are more than enough incredible virtual reality games out there to make up for it. So what games should you buy first? I would say everything you can get your hands on, but I’ll just narrow it down to my top 5.

5. Hotdogs, Horseshoes, and Hand Grenades

This game at its core is a gun range simulator, but it offers so much content that you can’t help but get lost in the different game modes and truckloads of guns to mess around with. You can roleplay a hotdog cowboy on a mission or play a rogue-lite game mode where you fight zombie weiners. That’s not sarcasm either. Every character in this game is a hot dog. There’s so much humor and obvious heart in this game that I don’t want to stay away. The developer is also incredibly active releases updates almost every week.


4. Pavlov

It’s Counter-Strike but in virtual reality. What more could you want? Pavlov might actually surprise you with what kind of shenanigans you can get into. It doesn’t just offer satisfying gunplay and semi-competitive gameplay. With easily added mods, you can play Halo zombies or Trouble in Terrorist Town. They make this game a great social experience oddly enough.

3. Boneworks

This is one of the most influential games to be released for virtual reality. It’s a physics-based shooter that takes heavy inspiration from the Half-Life games. The puzzles and shooting mechanics feel great and having a VR headset crab jump on your face is terrifying. The story is a little barebone, but Stress Level Zero more than makes up for it with their fun, albeit janky gameplay.

2. Beat Saber

Beat Saber is perhaps the most prolific VR game out right now and for good reason. The gameplay loop of slicing through boxes with a lightsaber while the music guides your timing is extremely satisfying. It’s super easy to learn and can actually be a great workout too. 

1. Half-Life: Alyx

This should come as no surprise, but Half-Life: Alyx is the premier virtual reality game. Valve nailed the environments, the story, and interactivity. The gravity gloves make even picking up ammo and health a lot of fun. The story is interesting, even for someone who’s never played Half-Life before, and adds new details that are better left discovered on your own. Alyx feels like a completely fleshed-out game where no elements are put to the wayside. 

Honorable Mentions:

  • The Walking Dead: Saints and Sinners
  • Blade and Sorcery
  • Onward
  • Pistol Whip
  • Until You Fall
  • Lone Echo

Continue Reading

AR/VR

Virtual Reality and How It Kept Us Connected Through Covid-19

Jesse Hoyt

Published

on

We’re finally getting past the worst Covid-19 and 2020 had to offer, a little worse for wear, but we got through it nonetheless. Layoffs, small businesses closing, and losing a feeling of safety were all tragic side effects of Covid-19. There is one that is perhaps the worst and most overlooked though: human connection. It’s one of the most important aspects of life and we struggle to thrive or even survive when we lose it. We lost an essential part of living and we did everything we could to try and bridge that newly missing piece of our lives. Among the options like Zoom and Facetime was something surprisingly great for social interaction: video games, and more specifically, virtual reality.

Any gamer would tell you that online video games are an incredible way to meet new people and forge surprisingly strong bonds with people you’ve never seen in person. I have met some incredible people just by hopping on my favorite games like Rainbow 6: Siege and Insurgency Sandstorm. Those people have become some great friends that I regularly talk with. I even start to miss them if it’s been a while. That’s not even mentioning how much gaming together can strengthen your relationships with people you already know. Video games are one of the absolute best ways you can bond with someone you already know. It’s how many kept in touch with their real-life friends. 


Virtual reality just brings another layer to that. It might surprise you that VR adds another layer of social interaction and reminds us how much our physical motion adds to our personality. You’re able to see so much more depth in a person when you see how they move their arms while they talk, or how they shake with laughter after doing something goofy. All of this is so clear in VR and it helps so much that virtual reality is so focused on being extremely social. VRChat is one of the most popular VR games available right now. It’s free and based entirely on social interaction with other people around the world. There isn’t any objective or goal to work towards. You’re just there to have fun, meet people, and chat about anything you want. You’re able to really connect with people(even if it’s mostly goofy or anime avatars) halfway across the world. 

VR helped a lot of people through tough times, just by some fun moments and interesting people. The joy you can get out of VR solely out of just seeing and interacting with other people proves how crucial virtual reality (and video games) were to helping us weather the storm. It showed so many that you can find beauty anywhere, even during a pandemic. 

Continue Reading

AR/VR

Why Virtual Reality Games Don’t Work On a Flat Screen

Jesse Hoyt

Published

on

We’ve seen countless games that start on monitors and TVs get ported to virtual reality. Incredible games like Skyrim and Fallout made for some fun, albeit wonky gameplay moments. Getting to actually be in Skyrim was certainly one of the highlights of my time in virtual reality. So why haven’t we seen VR games get transferred to the flat screen? We’ve seen modders do their best to translate VR games to 2-D, but it usually just makes an incredible VR experience into a mediocre video game.

Virtual Action

The answer can be kind of hard to pinpoint if you’ve never had the pleasure of diving into virtual reality. Even watching other players mess around in VR doesn’t give you a complete picture. Sure, you can see your favorite streamer have tons of fun, but actually diving in is so much different. These virtual reality games are not designed to just be played, but to be experienced. For example, picking up an object in VR actually serves as a core gameplay mechanic. You don’t just click a button; you drop down to one knee and physically reach out to grasp it. Shooting, reloading, crouching, and catching objects aren’t just parts of the game; they are the game. There’s no need for different and innovative mechanics since physically performing the action is so dang engrossing.


Flat Screen Virtual Reality Games Fall Flat

This is potentially the only reason that VR games just don’t work in 2-D. Half-Life: Alyx, possibly the best virtual reality game the world has ever seen, was modded into a flat-screen game and it turned out to be kind of boring aside from a stellar story. You just can’t be in the world the same way as you can in VR. The wonder came from being transported into City 17 and having headcrabs leaping at your face. You miss out on accidentally shattering a glass bottle which leads you to being attacked by the truly horrifying Jeff monster. It just isn’t the same, the thrill is absent when you can’t be there. We’ve never seen tech like VR before. Only virtual reality could make sifting through trash and opening cabinets fun.

2-D games aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, but let flat-screen games be flat screen and let virtual reality games be virtual reality. 

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Sign Up For The Latest Bite Sized Tech News


Trending

0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x